Past Events

Wed, 03/22/2017 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Wednesday, March 22, Cambridge Public Library, Main Library
449 Broadway, Cambridge
Light refreshments
RSVP to rprevite@cambridgehistory.org, 617-547-4252

Join us for our annual meeting; and a talk with Shaun Nichols about 'The Making (and Re-Making) of the Cambridge Economy'

How has global 'crisis capitalism' repeatedly impacted local workers, and made and un-made our Cambridge industries? ​In what ways are ​changing fortunes of our local economy continually bound to ​these larger dynamics?

Shaun Nichols Bio:
Dr. Shaun Nichols, College Fellow in History at Harvard University, will be talking from his ​ current book project, Crisis Capital: Industrial Massachusetts and the Making of Global Capitalism, 1813-Present ​, a global and local history of the rise and fall of industrial Massachusetts.

Shaun Nichols

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Changes to the Cambridge Historical Society Bylaws

Proposed March 22, 2017 at the Annual Meeting

Under VI. Officers and Council

Current Language:

1. Officers and Council: The officers of the Society shall be a president, three vice-presidents, a secretary with powers of clerk, a treasurer, an editor, a curator who shall all act as councilors in addition to acting as officers and there shall be seven additional councilors, constituting a fifteen member Council of the Society having the powers of a board of directors.

Proposed Language

1. Officers and Council: The officers of the Society shall be a president, three vice-presidents, a secretary with powers of clerk, a treasurer, an editor, a curator who shall all act as councilors in addition to acting as officers and there shall be eleven additional councilors, constituting a nineteen member Council of the Society having the powers of a board of directors.

Current Language

3. Length of Term: Except in the case of the secretary and treasurer, an officer may not serve more than six consecutive years in the same office, but may serve again in the same office after an interval of one year.

Proposed Language

3. Length of Term: Except in the case of the secretary and treasurer An officer may not serve more than six consecutive years in the same office, but may serve again in the same office after an interval of one year.

Under VIII. Society Meetings and Quorums

Current Language:

1. Meetings: The Annual Meeting of the Society shall be held on or before the first day of March of each year, at a time and place to be determined by the Council.

Proposed Language:

1. Meetings: The Annual Meeting of the Society shall be held on or before the first day of April of each year, at a time and place to be determined by the Council.

Fri, 02/24/2017 - 7:00pm - 8:30pm

Chocolate, chocolate, chocolate!

Enjoy a glass of wine while learning chocolate making basics. We'll discuss equipment, ingredients, and process, including fillings, and how to vary texture and flavor. This is largely a demonstration class, but you will go home with an assortment of chocolates!

What better way to spend a February evening than in the warm and charming Spindler Confections, where Jeremy Spindler will spin his sugar magic- showing you how he is making some of the tastiest candies in Cambridge today, and celebrating this area's candy making history with his display of local candy ephemera?

All proceeds benefit the Cambridge Historical Society's programs, thanks to the generosity of Spindler Confections.
Winner, Best Chocolates, 2016 Best of Boston
Due to venue size, space is limited to 15 people.
MINIMUM AGE is 18.
Metered street parking.
For questions, email lwaskelis@cambridgehistory.org or phone 617-547-4252

Register here: https://chocolatedemoclass.eventbrite.com

LOCATION:
Spindler Confections
2257 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02140

Tue, 02/07/2017 - 7:00pm - 8:30pm

"Building Old Cambridge: Architecture and Development"
Building Old Cambridge explores the oldest section of Cambridge, which was founded as the capital of Massachusetts Bay in 1630 and chosen as the site of Harvard College in 1636.Susan E. Maycock & Charles M. Sullivan

1400 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge,02138

Event is free. Register here: http://bit.ly/2j5OvoX

Tue, 12/06/2016 - 5:30pm - 7:30pm

You are Cordially invited to our Annual Member Holiday Party

Tuesday, December 6th at the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House, 159 Brattle Street

Light refreshments will be served | Festive Holiday attire encouraged

Please note: The Hooper-Lee-Nichols House is not handicapped Accessible. Limited Street parking is available.

Please RSVP by December, 1 to Rosemary Previte, rprevite@cambridgehistory.org or 617-547-4252

www.cambridgehistory.org

Thu, 11/17/2016 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Speakers:
Japonica Brown-Saracino, Associate Professor of Sociology, Boston University
Caroline Cheong, Assistant Professor of Public History, University of Central Floriday
Adam Tanaka, PhD Candidate, Harvard Graduate School of Design

In the third of three 'Housing for All' conversations, we will explore the future prospects for affordable housing in Cambridge, and the “we” in our 2016 theme, “Are We Home?” The goal is to inspire dialogue with an emphasis on curiosity and question-asking.

Participants are encouraged to bring their own experiences, questions and open-mindedness.

This 3-part symposium is supported by Mass Humanities, whose grants inspire considered thought, conversation, and action through the humanities. We’re happy to participate in their mission to improve civic life in Massachusetts. See more about what Mass Humanities does here: http://masshumanities.org/

Thank you to our generous sponsors!

Lead ($5,000)
Cambridge Savings Bank

Gold ($750)
Alexandria Real Estate Equities
Bullfinch Properties
Capital One Cafe
HYM Investment Group

Silver ($500)
Eastern Bank
Harvard Square Business Association

Bronze ($250)
Graffito SP
Leader Bank
North Cambridge Savings Bank

This event is free.
Registration required:https://www.eventbrite.com/e/housing-for-all-conversation-3-how-do-we-achieve-the-affordable-city-tickets-26631771345

Location:
Cambridge Public Library Central Square Branch, 45 Pearl St.

Transportation and Parking:
The Central Square Branch Library is accessible by both bus and subway.
Green Street Public Parking Garage: http://bit.ly/2c4Zvmg

Questions?
Email: lwaskelis@cambridgehistory.org
Call Cambridge Historical Society at (617) 547-4252

Sun, 10/30/2016 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm

The Cambridge Historical Society’s offices are in the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House, a history center. In addition to #Instameets and History Cafe, the Society is opening our doors and welcoming the public to our home. $5 for members and $10 for all non-members.

Please RSVP:
info@cambridgehistory.org
617-547-4252
Hooper-Lee-Nichols House
159 Brattle Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Thu, 10/27/2016 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Cambridge Historical Society presents a 3-part symposium about the past, present and future of affordable housing in Cambridge.

Conversation 2, 'What have been the successes & failures of affordable housing planning & activism?

Speakers:
Chris Arnold, Correspondent, National Public Radio, Moderator
Cheryl-Ann Pizza-Zeoli, Officer, Alliance of Cambridge Tenants
Gregory Russ, Executive Director, Cambridge Housing Authority
Jim Stockard, Retired Curator, Loeb Fellowship, Harvard Graduate School of Design

We will hear about what's been tried, where we have succeeded and failed. We'll ask what success looks like. The goal is to inspire dialogue with an emphasis on curiosity and question-asking. Participants are encouraged to bring their own experiences, questions and open-mindedness.

This 3-part symposium is supported by Mass Humanities, whose grants inspire considered thought, conversation, and action through the humanities. We’re happy to participate in their mission to improve civic life in Massachusetts. See more about what Mass Humanities does here: http://masshumanities.org/

Thank you to our generous sponsors: Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Bullfinch Properties, Cambridge Savings Bank, Capital One Cafe, Eastern Bank, Graffito SP, Harvard Square Business Association, HYM Investment Group, Leader Bank, and North Cambridge Co-Operative Bank.

This event is free.
Registration required: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/housing-for-all-conversation-2-what-have-be...

Location
Transportation and Parking Information:
Public transportation, #70 or #64 bus to Western Ave @ Howard Street, or limited street parking

Questions?
Email: lwaskelis@cambridgehistory.org
Call Cambridge Historical Society at (617) 547-4252

Thu, 10/13/2016 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Cambridge Historical Society presents a 3-part symposium about the past, present, and future of affordable housing in Cambridge.

Conversation 1, "How did we get here? What are the challenges? Who is the'we'?," brings a historical perspective to this issue.

Speakers:

Marjorie Decker, Massachusetts State Representative, Moderator
Barry Bluestone, Professor of Political Economy, Northeastern University
Corinne Espinoza, former Interim Executive Director, Cambridge Community Center
Charles Sullivan, Executive Director, Cambridge Historical Commission

We will explore the history of affordable housing in Cambridge, and the “we” in our 2016 theme, “Are We Home?” We will hear about what “home” means and has meant to Cantabrigians with different backgrounds and points of view. The goal is to inspire dialogue with an emphasis on curiosity and question-asking. Participants are encouraged to bring their own experiences, questions and open-mindedness.

Cambridge Public Library Main Branch Auditorium, 449 Broadway
This 3-part symposium is supported by Mass Humanities, whose grants inspire considered thought, conversation, and action through the humanities. We’re happy to participate in their mission to improve civic life in Massachusetts.

See more about what Mass Humanities does here: http://masshumanities.org/

Thank you to our generous sponsors!

Lead ($5,000)
Cambridge Savings Bank

Gold ($750)
Alexandria Real Estate Equities
Bullfinch Properties
Capital One Cafe
HYM Investment Group

Silver ($500)
Eastern Bank
Harvard Square Business Association

Bronze ($250)
Graffito SP
Leader Bank
North Cambridge Savings Bank

This event is free.
Registration required: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/housing-for-all-conversation-1-how-did-we-g...

Location:
Cambridge Public Library Main Branch
449 Broadway
Cambridge, MA 02138

Transportation and Parking Information:
The Main Library is accessible by both bus and subway.
A 70-car underground parking garage with access from Broadway is available when the library is open. It costs 25 cents for every 15 minutes of parking. You may pay by using quarters or credit card (Mastercard or Visa).

Questions?
Email: lwaskelis@cambridgehistory.org
Call Cambridge Historical Society at (617) 547-4252

Mon, 10/03/2016 - 6:30pm - 8:00pm

Join the conversation!
This month we're asking 'How do you make ends meet in today's rising housing market?' with the help of Molly Turner, Global Head of Civic Partnerships, Airbnb

What’s our goal?
The Cambridge Historical Society wants to facilitate dynamic conversations about the housing issues facing Cambridge residents today with a historical perspective.

Where and why?
We are heading out to meet you in the city. The Abbey in Porter Square (1755 Mass. Ave ) is the perfect setting to bring your friends (or make new ones), grab a drink, and settle in for some engaging conversation about our 2016 theme, "Are We Home?"

Tickets:
$5 members/ $10 non-members

Mon, 06/20/2016 (All day) - Wed, 06/22/2016 (All day)

June 13-15 & June 20-22, 2016
For six days over two weeks, twelve archives, special collections and collecting institutions in Cambridge will open their doors to the public to showcase some of their most interesting materials -- and the tales that go along with them.

The Schedule: Sign up for one day or all!
--Event is FREE but registration is required--

Week One:
Monday, 6/13, 3-5 pm: Cambridge Historical Commission & The MIT Museum
Tuesday, 6/14, 4-6 pm: Schlesinger Library & the Longfellow House-Washington's Headquarters
Wednesday, 6/15, 4-6 pm: Harvard Art Museums Archives & Harvard University Archives

Week Two:
Monday, 6/20, 3-5 pm: MIT Lewis Music Library & MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections
Tuesday, 6/21, 3-5 pm: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University & the Harvard Semitic Museum
Wednesday, 6/22, 6-8 pm: Mount Auburn Cemetery & the Cambridge Historical Society

Please CLICK HERE for more information and to register !

Due to space constraints, a max of 20 participants are allowed each day.
Questions? Email Emily at egonzalez@cambridgema.gov or call 617-349-4683

 

Sat, 06/18/2016 - 11:30am

Our first ever Instameet takes places at the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House on Saturday, June 18 at 11:30 AM.

What's an Instameet?
It's when a group of people with Instagram accounts come together to photograph the same topic at the same time. We'll be answering the question, "What makes Cambridge feel like home?" through photos!

How can I participate?
On your smartphone, sign up for an Instagram account
Follow the Society @cambridgehistorical
Show up on June 18 ready to photograph
Follow the event on social media with the hashtag #CHSInstameet

This event is free and open to the public.

Hooper-Lee-Nichols House
159 Brattle Street, Cambridge
Thu, 06/16/2016 - 6:30pm - 9:00pm

Are you the keeper of your family's history - or perhaps of other families' - and looking to go beyond census records and the family tree?

Have you hit roadblocks that call for new tools or ways of thinking about your project?

Join artist and family historian Avery Williamson for a workshop about doing family history research and making what you find meaningful.

The workshop will include a viewing of the Historical Society's exhibition featuring Williamson's artwork alongside objects from the collections of both the Hooper Lee Nichols house and the 2016 Cambridge History Fellows.

By the end of the evening you will have new, creative ways to think about doing your research and turning your project into compelling media, and a thoughtful group of fellow researchers with whom you can discuss your practice. And just in time for Father's Day, Juneteenth, and any other family gatherings you might be attending this summer.

 
Member - $5.00
Non-member - $10.00
Hooper-Lee-Nichols House - 159 Brattle Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
Mon, 06/13/2016 - 6:30pm - 8:00pm

Housing stock is a problem in Cambridge. Are "Tiny Houses" a solution?

Join us at the Abbey in Porter Square as architect Rashmi Ramaswamy looks at Tiny Houses through the lens of an architect, analyzing zoning changes that may be needed, and comparing housing size across time to look at trends in big/small housing.

The Cambridge Historical Society is for everyone in Cambridge, so we are heading out to meet you in the city. Bring your friends to the Abbey, grab a drink and a snack, and settle in for some engaging conversation around our 2016 theme, "Are We Home?"

$5 for members / $10 non-members
Cash bar
Tickets available on eventbrite or at the door

The Abbey, Cambridge
1755 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, Massachusetts 0214

Questions? Email us at rprevite@cambridgehistory.org or call us at 617-547-4252.

Mon, 06/13/2016 (All day) - Wed, 06/15/2016 (All day)

June 13-15 & June 20-22, 2016
For six days over two weeks, twelve archives, special collections and collecting institutions in Cambridge will open their doors to the public to showcase some of their most interesting materials -- and the tales that go along with them.

The Schedule: Sign up for one day or all!
--Event is FREE but registration is required--

Week One:
Monday, 6/13, 3-5 pm: Cambridge Historical Commission & The MIT Museum
Tuesday, 6/14, 4-6 pm: Schlesinger Library & the Longfellow House-Washington's Headquarters
Wednesday, 6/15, 4-6 pm: Harvard Art Museums Archives & Harvard University Archives

Week Two:
Monday, 6/20, 3-5 pm: MIT Lewis Music Library & MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections
Tuesday, 6/21, 3-5 pm: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University & the Harvard Semitic Museum
Wednesday, 6/22, 6-8 pm: Mount Auburn Cemetery & the Cambridge Historical Society

Please CLICK HERE for more information and to register ! 

Due to space constraints, a max of 20 participants are allowed each day.
Questions? Email Emily at egonzalez@cambridgema.gov or call 617-349-4683

Tue, 05/17/2016 - 6:30pm - 8:00pm

 
What's our goal?
To facilitate dynamic conversations about the issues facing Cambridge residents today with a historical perspective.

Who is helping us?

Sarah Boyer, Author and Cambridge Oral Historian
Ellen Kokinda, Assistant Planner, Community Development Department

Where, when, and why?
The Cambridge Historical Society is for everyone in Cambridge, so we are heading out to meet you in the city. Bring your friends (or make new ones) to Asgard Irish Pub, grab a drink and a snack, and settle in for some engaging conversation around our 2016 theme, "Are We Home?"
 

Questions?

Email us at rprevite@cambridgehistory.org or call us at 617-547-4252.

 

Asgard Irish Pub & Restaurant - 350 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 

Tue, 05/10/2016 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

 

 

Join us for an evening of fun, friendship, and great food.
All proceeds will benefit our work promoting
and preserving Cambridge history.
 
Tuesday May 10 • 6–8pm
Cambridge Innovation Center
1 Broadway, Cambridge
 
Libations & Hors D’oeuvres
Program Highlighting Our Theme, “Are We Home Yet?”
Entertainment & Dessert Reception & Home-Themed Silent Auction

 

Festive business attire • Please RSVP by May 2

 

Platinum supporter | $5,000 (10 complimentary tickets, full page in program)
Gold supporter | $1,500 (3 complimentary tickets, full page in program)
Silver supporter | $750 (2 complimentary tickets, full page in program)
Bronze supporter | $500 (2 complimentary tickets, half page in program)
Friend supporter | $250 (1 complimentary ticket, half page in program)

Purchase your tickets here

Mon, 04/25/2016 - 6:30pm - 8:00pm

Join us for our first History Café!
 
What’s our goal?
To facilitate dynamic conversations about the issues facing Cambridge residents today with a historical perspective.
 
Who is helping us?
Japonica Brown-Saracino, Associate Professor of Sociology at Boston University and Tim Devin, a grassroots artist who focuses on development, gentrification, public space, and the environment.
 
Where, when, and why?
The Cambridge Historical Society is for everyone in Cambridge, so we are heading out to meet you in the city. The historic Hong Kong in Harvard Square is the perfect setting for this informal presentation. Bring your friends (or make new ones), grab a drink, and settle in for some engaging conversation around our 2016 theme, "Are We Home?"

Hong Kong Restaurant
1238 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
Tickets
$5 members/ $10 non-members
Questions?
Email us at rprevite@cambridgehistory.org or call us at 617-547-4252.

Tue, 01/26/2016 (All day) - Fri, 02/19/2016 (All day)
 
The Cambridge Historical Society is seeking Cambridge residents who can help us explore this year's thematic question: Are we home? The fellows' work will help the Society achieve its goal of bringing historical perspective to one of the most important conversations in our city today. 
 
Applications are due February 19
Interviews will be held the week of February 22
Successful applicants will be invited to attend the Society's annual meeting on March 9
Projects will be completed by November 2016
 
Click HERE for more information! 
 
Sat, 01/09/2016 - 4:30pm - 6:00pm

See, smell, hear, touch, and taste the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House like never before! This fall, the second-oldest building in Cambridge will come alive through a performance by actors from Cambridge Historical Tours. Walk in the footsteps of the former residents of the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House as you relive Cambridge from the 17th to 21st centuries.

Cost: $20 for members of the Cambridge Historical Society; $25 non-members. To purchase tickets (& view other event dates), visit Eventbrite or call 617-547-4252.

Light refreshments included with your ticket. Seating is limited and reservations are required. The Hooper-Lee-Nichols House is not handicap accessible.

Limited parking is available. Recommended for ages 12 and up. For more info email us at info@cambridgehistory.org

Thu, 12/17/2015 - 6:00pm - 7:30pm

See, smell, hear, touch, and taste the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House like never before! This fall, the second-oldest building in Cambridge will come alive through a performance by actors from Cambridge Historical Tours. Walk in the footsteps of the former residents of the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House as you relive Cambridge from the 17th to 21st centuries.
 
Cost: $20 for members of the Cambridge Historical Society; $25 non-members. To purchase tickets (& view other event dates), visit Eventbrite or call 617-547-4252.
 
Light refreshments included with your ticket. Seating is limited and reservations are required. The Hooper-Lee-Nichols House is not handicap accessible.
 
Limited parking is available. Recommended for ages 12 and up. For more info email us at info@cambridgehistory.org
 

Tue, 12/08/2015 - 5:30pm - 7:30pm

Join us as we celebrate the successes of our 110th year! 

Location: Hooper-Lee-Nichols House

Light Refreshments will be served. RSVP to Rosemary Previte at info@cambridgehistory.org or 617-547-4252

Thu, 11/19/2015 - 6:00pm - 7:30pm

See, smell, hear, touch, and taste the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House like never before! This fall, the second-oldest building in Cambridge will come alive through a performance by actors from Cambridge Historical Tours. Walk in the footsteps of the former residents of the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House as you relive Cambridge from the 17th to 21st centuries.

Cost: $20 for members of the Cambridge Historical Society; $25 non-members. To purchase tickets (& view other event dates), visit Eventbrite or call 617-547-4252.

Light refreshments included with your ticket. Seating is limited and reservations are required. The Hooper-Lee-Nichols House is not handicap accessible.

Limited parking is available. Recommended for ages 12 and up. For more info email us at info@cambridgehistory.org

Thu, 01/22/2015 - 5:30pm - 8:00pm

Welcome in the New Year with the Cambridge Historical Society.

Eat, drink, and be merry with fellow Historical Society members and learn about our plans for the coming year.

Parking will be available to non-residents on Brattle Street between Fayerweather and Sparks Streets during this event.

Please RSVP to Frank Reece at freece@cambridgehistory.org

or call us at 617-547-4252

A donation of $10 is suggested.

Sat, 11/22/2014 - 11:00am - 3:00pm

Washington Elm Exhibit
Featuring photographs from
Bruce Myren's Fate of the Elms series

Public Reception: Thursday, November 13

Exhibit Hours:
Saturday, November 8, 11-3 and
Saturday, November 22, 11-3.

**Additional hours will be announced**

Hooper-Lee-Nichols House
159 Brattle Street, Cambridge

The Cambridge Historical Society, working with artist Bruce Myren, will mount an exhibit featuring historic representations of the Elm, pieces of the tree, collectibles made from the Elm’s wood, and Myren's large-format photos of scions, cuttings grown to create clones of the original tree.

In the early nineteenth century, George Washington mania swept the country. His image was printed on everything from axes to garter belts. Cambridge, where Washington took control of the Continental Army, was featured prominently, and the Washington Elm gained an exalted place. Images of the Elm appeared on teacups, on stationery, and in paintings, while scions were planted by the hundreds across the country.

When the tree fell in 1923, it was cut into pieces, with cross sections going to the capitals of the forty-eight states, the White House, and the Capitol, and blocks going to prominent citizens across the country.

Myren quotes the English philosopher Bernard Williams when describing the show: "A myth is a fanciful picture of the past designed to justify certain activities in the present."

Bruce Myren
Currently, Myren is an Adjunct Professor at Lesley University College of Art and Design and Lecturer at Northeastern University; recently, he was a Visiting Lecturer of Art at Amherst College and Critic at the Rhode Island School of Design. He is the Chair of the Northeast Region of the Society for Photographic Education and sits on the board of directors of the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University.

In his work, Myren investigates issues of place and space, often via the exploration and employment of locative systems, either literal or metaphoric. Myren's recent series include an investigation of the Fortieth Parallel of latitude; a piece that documents the view from every place he has lived to where he lives now; and a study of the poet Robert Francis’s one-person house in the woods of Amherst, MA.

For previews from the Fate of the Elm series, visit www.brucemyren.com.

This exhibit is supported by grants from the Cambridge Arts Council and the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati.

Thu, 11/13/2014 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Washington Elm Exhibit
Featuring photographs from
Bruce Myren's Fate of the Elms series

Public Reception: Thursday, November 13, 6-8 pm

Attendees are authorized to park in Cambridge Permit parking spots on Brattle Street between Sparks and Fayerweather, one night only.
 

Exhibit Hours:
Saturday, November 8, 11-3 and
Saturday, November 22, 11-3.

**Additional hours will be announced**

Hooper-Lee-Nichols House
159 Brattle Street, Cambridge

The Cambridge Historical Society, working with artist Bruce Myren, will mount an exhibit featuring historic representations of the Elm, pieces of the tree, collectibles made from the Elm’s wood, and Myren's large-format photos of scions, cuttings grown to create clones of the original tree.

In the early nineteenth century, George Washington mania swept the country. His image was printed on everything from axes to garter belts. Cambridge, where Washington took control of the Continental Army, was featured prominently, and the Washington Elm gained an exalted place. Images of the Elm appeared on teacups, on stationery, and in paintings, while scions were planted by the hundreds across the country.

When the tree fell in 1923, it was cut into pieces, with cross sections going to the capitals of the forty-eight states, the White House, and the Capitol, and blocks going to prominent citizens across the country.

Myren quotes the English philosopher Bernard Williams when describing the show: "A myth is a fanciful picture of the past designed to justify certain activities in the present."

Bruce Myren
Currently, Myren is an Adjunct Professor at Lesley University College of Art and Design and Lecturer at Northeastern University; recently, he was a Visiting Lecturer of Art at Amherst College and Critic at the Rhode Island School of Design. He is the Chair of the Northeast Region of the Society for Photographic Education and sits on the board of directors of the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University.

In his work, Myren investigates issues of place and space, often via the exploration and employment of locative systems, either literal or metaphoric. Myren's recent series include an investigation of the Fortieth Parallel of latitude; a piece that documents the view from every place he has lived to where he lives now; and a study of the poet Robert Francis’s one-person house in the woods of Amherst, MA.

For previews from the Fate of the Elm series, visit www.brucemyren.com.

This exhibit is supported by grants from the Cambridge Arts Council and the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati.

 

The image above is from the Cambridge Historical Society's postcard collection.

Sat, 11/08/2014 - 11:00am - 3:00pm

Washington Elm Exhibit
Featuring photographs from
Bruce Myren's Fate of the Elms series

Public Reception: Thursday, November 13

Exhibit Hours:
Saturday, November 8, 11-3 and
Saturday, November 22, 11-3.

**Additional hours will be announced**

Hooper-Lee-Nichols House
159 Brattle Street, Cambridge

The Cambridge Historical Society, working with artist Bruce Myren, will mount an exhibit featuring historic representations of the Elm, pieces of the tree, collectibles made from the Elm’s wood, and Myren's large-format photos of scions, cuttings grown to create clones of the original tree.

In the early nineteenth century, George Washington mania swept the country. His image was printed on everything from axes to garter belts. Cambridge, where Washington took control of the Continental Army, was featured prominently, and the Washington Elm gained an exalted place. Images of the Elm appeared on teacups, on stationery, and in paintings, while scions were planted by the hundreds across the country.

When the tree fell in 1923, it was cut into pieces, with cross sections going to the capitals of the forty-eight states, the White House, and the Capitol, and blocks going to prominent citizens across the country.

Myren quotes the English philosopher Bernard Williams when describing the show: "A myth is a fanciful picture of the past designed to justify certain activities in the present."

Bruce Myren
Currently, Myren is an Adjunct Professor at Lesley University College of Art and Design and Lecturer at Northeastern University; recently, he was a Visiting Lecturer of Art at Amherst College and Critic at the Rhode Island School of Design. He is the Chair of the Northeast Region of the Society for Photographic Education and sits on the board of directors of the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University.

In his work, Myren investigates issues of place and space, often via the exploration and employment of locative systems, either literal or metaphoric. Myren's recent series include an investigation of the Fortieth Parallel of latitude; a piece that documents the view from every place he has lived to where he lives now; and a study of the poet Robert Francis’s one-person house in the woods of Amherst, MA.

For previews from the Fate of the Elm series, visit www.brucemyren.com.

This exhibit is supported by grants from the Cambridge Arts Council and the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati.

 

A stereocard view of the Washington Elm and Arch commemorating the 3rd of July Centennial Celebration of Washington's taking command of the American Army, 1875. [1A.0098 CHS]

Tue, 10/28/2014 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Washington Elm Exhibit
Featuring photographs from Bruce Myren's Fate of the Elms series

Artist Talk & Preview
Live music by Sean Staples and Eric Royer
Speakers: Bruce Myren and Gavin W. Kleespies
Light refreshments

TICKETS $25
All proceeds benefit the Cambridge Historical Society.

AVAILABLE ONLINE:

Name(s) of Attendee(s)

 

Public Reception: Thursday, November 13

Hooper-Lee-Nichols House
159 Brattle Street, Cambridge

The Cambridge Historical Society, working with artist Bruce Myren, will mount an exhibit featuring historic representations of the Elm, pieces of the tree, collectibles made from the Elm’s wood, and Myren's large-format photos of scions, cuttings grown to create clones of the original tree.

In the early nineteenth century, George Washington mania swept the country. His image was printed on everything from axes to garter belts. Cambridge, where Washington took control of the Continental Army, was featured prominently, and the Washington Elm gained an exalted place. Images of the Elm appeared on teacups, on stationery, and in paintings, while scions were planted by the hundreds across the country.

When the tree fell in 1923, it was cut into pieces, with cross sections going to the capitals of the forty-eight states, the White House, and the Capitol, and blocks going to prominent citizens across the country.

Myren quotes the English philosopher Bernard Williams when describing the show: "A myth is a fanciful picture of the past designed to justify certain activities in the present."

 

Bruce Myren
Currently, Myren is an Adjunct Professor at Lesley University College of Art and Design and Lecturer at Northeastern University; recently, he was a Visiting Lecturer of Art at Amherst College and Critic at the Rhode Island School of Design. He is the Chair of the Northeast Region of the Society for Photographic Education and sits on the board of directors of the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University.

In his work, Myren investigates issues of place and space, often via the exploration and employment of locative systems, either literal or metaphoric. Myren's recent series include an investigation of the Fortieth Parallel of latitude; a piece that documents the view from every place he has lived to where he lives now; and a study of the poet Robert Francis’s one-person house in the woods of Amherst, MA.

For previews from the Fate of the Elm series, visit www.brucemyren.com.

 

This exhibit is supported by grants from the Cambridge Arts Council and the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati.

The image above is from the Cambridge Historical Society's postcard collection

Sat, 10/11/2014 - 10:30am - 5:00pm

Oct. 11 Event Cancelled to to Rain. 

However, the If This House Could Talk project will continue through October 18. Download the PDF list and map of neighborhood story markers below.

 

The 6th annual Cambridgeport History Day will explore one of our city’s most vibrant neighborhoods. The event includes walking tours, hands on events at Dana Park, and nationally famous “If This House Could Talk” program across the neighborhood.

Learn something new about the people, houses, and neighborhoods of your city. The event is a collaboration of the Cambridge Historical Society, the Cambridge Historical Commission, the Cambridge Arts Council, Cambridgeport Neighborhood Association, the Riverside Boat Club, and other community groups.

Schedule of events in Dana Park

10:30   “If This House Could Talk” booth opens

11:00-12:30   Transportation walking tour with Charles Sullivan

12:30-1:30   CNA Potluck Lunch

1:15-5:00   Talks, demonstrations and displays in the Park

1:15 & 2:15   Demonstration of hand-operated letterpress

1:30-2:00   Cambridgeport Streets - Gavin Kleespies

2:30-3:00   Building the subway talk - Kit Rawlins

3:30-4:00   Inner Belt Controversy - Steve Kaiser

4:00-5:00   Neighborhood Walk with Kit Rawlins
 

Live music all afternoon!

 

Event sponsored by
Forest City, Cambridge Savings Bank, and Cambridge Trust Company.

Wed, 09/03/2014 - 5:30pm - 8:00pm

Volunteers Needed for a
Newsletter Mailing Party!

Hooper-Lee-Nichols House
159 Brattle Street
5:30-8 pm

rsvp@cambridgehistory.org

 

Meet fellow local history fans over pizza, beer, and mailing labels galore. We've got 2,000 copies to collate, label, fold, and seal at our honey locust tables in the Bosphorous Room.

Let us know if you will join us by calling 617-547-4252 or emailing rsvp@cambridgehistory.org.

 

This issue of the Cambridge Historian features the Port neighborhood and includes an original graphic history by local artists Jerel Dye and Roho.

Will we see you at Area 4 Pride Day on September 6?
 

Special thanks to Cambridge Savings Bank for sponsoring this issue of
The Cambridge Historian.

Thu, 08/07/2014 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Click HERE to view photos.

Thank you for joining the Cambridge Historical Society and Cambridge Historical Tours at our 1916 Garden Party.

The Garden Party was featured in the Boston Globe!

We at the Society would like to add that yes, we do know that Edwardian times were long after our house was built in 1685. However, it was in 1916 that well-known preservation architect Joseph Everett Chandler was hired to enlarge the house. 


 

We were delighted that Charles Henry Dana III, Alice Longfellow, Ruth Jones, and Samuel Francis Batchelder were able to come back from the hereafter to join us for croquet and cocktails. 

Special thanks to the Cambridge Homes, Deborah Hughes, Goorin BrothersHendrick's Gin, our historical characters, Longy School of Music, our volunteers, and of course, Asher.

We had such a blast (with the past) that 
we might make this party an annual event...

 


Cocktails, Croquet, and Characters!

August 7
6-8 PM
The Hooper-Lee-Nichols House
159 Brattle Street, Cambridge

To attend our party, you'll travel back in time to 1916. Meet costumed characters from local lore, play party games, and sip era specific cocktails and appetizers. You can even try on some of our fantastic costumes to join in the fun.

The evening will also feature a music ensemble from Longy School of Music of Bard College, in celebration of its own centennial, beginning October, 2015.

Parking available on Brattle Street between Appleton and Fayerweather Streets for this special event.

 

Sponsored by

Sat, 07/26/2014 - 1:00pm - Sun, 07/27/2014 - 1:00pm

We're sorry-

The Speak Out Tours for July 26-27
ARE CANCELED DUE TO A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Voices From The Cambridge Counterculture 1968-1971

Join CHS as we explore sites that played host to protests, sit-ins, and the exchange of radical ideas in Central Square, Riverside, and Harvard Square during an era of strong political and social unrest. Tour guide Brian Yen will touch upon the groundswell of community activism concerning the war in Vietnam, race relations, the sexual revolution, women’s rights, and the preservation of community housing.

 

 

Mon, 07/14/2014 (All day) - Thu, 07/17/2014 (All day)

The Open Archives tour is a chance to see behind the scenes at a number of archives and unique collecting agencies in Cambridge.

In 2014 we are featuring ten archives over four days with the theme of "Adventures in Gastronomy." See original images, plans, and documents related to food, dining, cooking, entertaining, and other adventures in gastronomy.

Participating institutions

Cambridge Historical Commission
Cambridge Historical Society
Cambridge Public Works
Harvard University Archives
Longfellow House - Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site
MIT Institute Archives & Special Collections
MIT Lewis Music Library
MIT Museum
Mount Auburn Cemetery
Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute

Reservations are required. Space is limited.
For more information, visit www.cambridgearchives.org or call 617-547-4252

Sponsored by
Reclaimed wood flooring, beams, paneling, and custom milling: Longleaf Lumber.

Wed, 06/25/2014 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

The Karen Aqua Gallery
CCTV
438 Massachusetts Avenue
Central Square, Cambridge
617-661-6900
www.cctvcambridge.org
Exhibit open through June 25
 
We are proud to announce the fifth exhibition of our "50 for 50" photo contest winners. The reception on the evening of June 25 will be free and open to the public. Light snacks will be provided. Artists, we'd love for you to meet each other!
Reception RSVPs encouraged: rsvp@cambridgehistory.org

What do you think makes Cambridge Cambridge?

Last summer, we invited photographers to use an image to complete the phrase ''Cambridge wouldn't be Cambridge without ...'' in conjunction with our November Preservation Celebration.

This event marked the 50th anniversary of the first meeting of the Cambridge Historical Commission, so we chose 50 photos from all of the submissions for this traveling exhibit.

These images represent a slice of what makes Cambridge a special place. The show has been exhibited at the Cambridge Multicultural Arts Center, the Cambridge Hospital, the Gutman Library at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and the 1369 Coffee House.

A final exhibition of the complete show will be hung at the Cambridge Homes in July. For additional details, visit www.cambridgehistory.org/50for50.

A selection of prints are available for purchase:
info@cambridgehistory.org
 
The "50 for 50" exhibit is sponsored by Hammond Residential Real Estate.

Tue, 06/24/2014 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

The Maud Morgan Arts Center
20 Sacramento Street
Co-Sponsored by Agassiz Baldwin Community (ABC).
Whether you're a proud resident, a curious stranger, or somewhere in between, we hope you'll join us for a gathering at the Maud Morgan Arts Center on the evening of Tuesday, June 24.
A few special guests will share tidbits on the history of the area.
Our latest newsletter, which features this neighborhood, is now available for download. www.cambridgehistory.org/newsletters.
To join our mailing list, please become a member today. Join online at www.cambridgehistory.org/membership.
Light refreshments will be served. The event is free of charge.
Please RSVP: 617-547-4252 or rsvp@cambridgehistory.org.
 
Read about this famous porch in our spring newsletter. Photo by Historical Society member Debbie Pento.

Thu, 06/12/2014 - 6:00pm - 9:00pm

Cambridge Boat Club
2 Gerrys Landing Rd
Directions and Parking Info.

The streets of Cambridge are alive. From farmers markets to neighborhood block parties, to the city dance party, the Cambridge community uses urban spaces as a canvas and paints a picture of a vibrant and diverse community. The Cambridge Historical Society is planning a Spring Benefit that will explore the exciting streetscapes of our city and the great parties that happen on them. We hope you’ll join us in celebrating this history.

Among our special guests are:

  • José Mateo of the Dance for World Community Festival
  • Nicola Williams of Cambridge Carnival International
  • George Emlen & Paddy Swanson of Revels
  • Reebee Garofalo & Kevin Leppmann of HONK!

Tickets are limited to 100 at $150 each, so please purchase yours today.

If you would like to learn about sponsoring our Spring Benefit, click here

Buy tickets online or contact rsvp@cambridgehistory.org, 617-547-4252

Name(s) of Attendees

 

If you cannot attend but would like to support the event: CLICK HERE.
We will list your name in the event program.

Lead Sponsor:


Hammond Real Estate

Sponsors of the Spring Benefit include:
Irving House at Harvard
Bruner-Cott & Associates
Cambridge Trust Company
The Bulfinch Companies, Inc.

Mount Auburn Hospital

Ambit Creative Group
Boston Beer Company
Cambridge Innovation Center
C. Brendan Noonan and Co.
Capizzi & Co., Inc.
The Charles Hotel
East Cambridge Savings Bank
Jean Brooks Landscapes
Leavitt and Peirce, Inc.
S+H Construction
Thoughtforms Corporation, Builders
Trinity Property Management

Dragonfly Irrigation and Garden Services
Eliot Street Café / Dunkin Donuts
Michael F. Hanlon, Landscape Gardening and Design

Tue, 05/20/2014 - 5:00pm - 7:00pm

Hammond Residential Real Estate invites you to a special reception for members of the Cambridge Historical Society and DOCOMOMO-US/New England.

Hammond Vice President John Petrowsky is opening the doors to the Paul Rudolph-designed home at 144 Upland Road. We hope to see you at this event.

Please call the Historical Society at 617-547-4252 for additional information.

Sat, 04/26/2014 - 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Today's Porter Square is the home of restaurants, shops, and the longest staircase on the MBTA. However, the area has a long history that is not always visible: the site of Gallows Hill, the cattle yards, and one of Cambridge's last grand estates, to name a few. Join guide Eleanor Fisher on a walking tour to explore this history. Bring memories to share!

Tickets
Names of other participant(s)

Tour Begins at 1 PM.

The meeting point: the Porter Square Shopping Center, in front of Porter Square Books.

Annual Historical Society membership starts at $25.00, you can join here.

Special thanks to tour sponsor Cambridge Offset Printing.
 

 

Sat, 04/12/2014 - 1:00pm - 3:30pm

Revisit the dearly departed restaurants of Harvard Square. Tour guide Mara Steinitz will share her research on some of our most fondly remembered eateries. Special guests will tell tales of working in these establishments, and attendees are encouraged to contribute their own memories. Meet at 56 Brattle Street, former site of The Window Shop.

Two tours: 1:00 and 3:30 p.m.

$20 for non-members
$10 for members

Tickets
Tour

This tour was made possible through the generous sponsorship of  

92 Winthrop Street, Harvard Square

Annual Historical Society membership starts at $25.00, you can join here.

Sun, 02/02/2014 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm

The Cambridge Historical Society’s 109th Annual Meeting
At The Hooper-Lee-Nichols House 159 Brattle Street Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138

The election of the Society’s governing council, a review of our work in 2013, and a statement of our goals for 2014 will precede the program. 

Keynote speaker:
David Fixler is a principal at EYP specializing in working with historic buildings, in particular those of the 20th-century modern movement. He has guided the renovation of landmark facilities, including Alvar Aalto’s Baker House at MIT, Harvard’s Widener Library, and the United Nations Headquarters. A writer and lecturer, Fixler has published his work in a variety of journals, including the recent CHS publication Saving Cambridge.

 

All available spaces for this event are full.

Sat, 01/11/2014 - 4:00pm - 6:00pm

This event is full. If you would like to be added to the waiting list, please send an email to rsvp@cambridgehistory.org. 

Join renovation consultant Bruce Irving, architect John Altobello, interior designer Dee Elms, and general contractor Charlie Allen to learn the best ways to put your project together.

The experts will show you how the team approach saves you time, money, and worry in the renovation of your home, be it historic or not.

When:  Saturday, January 11, 2014, 4:00-6:00 pm
Where:  The Hooper-Lee-Nichols House 159 Brattle Street Cambridge, Mass.

Bruce Irving brings 25 years' experience with houses--including 17 as producer of This Old House--to his work as a Cambridge-based realtor and home renovation consultant.

Cambridge architect John Altobello specializes in home renovation and restoration. A foundation of his work is excellent communication with his clients. Knowing how to listen and understand project goals are key ingredients for a successful outcome.

Dee Elms is a principal of Terrat Elms Interior Design, a leading Boston design firm. In addition to her extensive portfolio of work for clients throughout the Northeast, Dee has also served as interior designer for two recent seasons of This Old House (the Bedford and Cambridge projects).  Dee lives in Cambridge with her husband and two young sons.

Charlie Allen founded Cambridge-based Charlie Allen Renovations in 1978. The award-winning firm specializes in the remodeling and restoration of period homes.  He has served as Chairman of the Board of the National Association of the Remodeling Industry’s Eastern Massachusetts chapter and as President of the Cambridge Historical Society.  Charlie lives in Cambridgeport.

Wed, 12/11/2013 - 5:30pm - 8:00pm

Join us for our annual Holiday Party at our home at 159 Brattle Street, 02138.
Eat, drink, and be merry with fellow Historical Society members. Swap stories with fellow Cambridge-lovers as local musicians play us some traditional Celtic tunes.
This will also be the first chance to see the restored Hooper-Lee-Nichols House.
Food & Beer donations by 
Cafe Sushi
Elephant Walk
Follow the Honey, Inc.
Smuttynose Brewing Company
 
If you are planning to attend, please let us know at rsvp@cambridgehistory.org.
The event is free of charge; donations of all sizes are welcome. We will also be selling Saving Cambridge and other books.
If you would like to contribute food or wine, please email info@cambridgehistory.org.

Thu, 11/21/2013 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

The Cambridge Historical Society and the New England Folk Music Archives announce an evening of conversation and music.

At 6:00 pm, former WUMB program director Brian Quinn will discuss and explore the rich history of folk music around the greater Boston area with musicians Lorraine and Bennett Hammond. This conversation will be recorded for The New England Folk Music Archives' oral history collection.

Following the conversation, Lorraine and Bennett will perform traditional and original compositions on guitar, dulcimer, and harp, drawing on a long folk tradition.
Suggested donation: $10 at the door
Additional support greatly appreciated
The event takes place at the Historical Society's house:
the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House, 159 Brattle Street, Cambridge.

Wed, 11/20/2013 - 10:00am - 2:00pm

Join us for our annual fall garden clean up. For more information, please email us at info@cambridgehistory.org
 

Wed, 11/13/2013 - 6:00pm - 8:30pm

This event is sold out

VIP Reception and Event
 
5-8:30 pm
 
$150 per person
 
Event 6-8:30 pm $35 per person

At the Cambridge Multicultural Arts Center
41 Second Street Cambridge, Mass.

November 13, 2013 is the 50th anniversary of the first meeting of our sister organization, the Cambridge Historical Commission. To celebrate this milestone, the Historical Society is planning a gala celebration of the preservation movement in our fair city and an exhibit at the Multi-Cultural Arts Center.

To be placed on the wait list, please contact info@cambridgehistory.org  

SPEAKERS

Tod Beaty President of the Cambridge Historical Society
Robert Rettig Member of the original staff of the Cambridge Historical Commission
Jim Rafferty Cambridge Lawyer
Charles Sullivan Executive Director of the Cambridge Historical Commission

SPONSORS: 

The Cambridge Savings Bank
Hammond Residential Real Estate

Irving House at Harvard
Shawmut Design and Construction

• Beal and Company, Inc.
• The Cambridge Homes
• Cambridge Seven Associates
• Cambridge Trust Company
• Lesley University
• Prellwitz Chilinski Associates
• Thayer-Christenson, LLC

• A Bed and Breakfast in Cambridge
• Bonny’s Landscape Services, Inc.
• Cambridge Brewing Company
• Cambridge Landscape Company, Inc.

• Capizzi and Company, Inc.

SPECIAL THANKS: 

50 for 50 Artists
• Cambridge Multicultural Arts Center
• Cambridge Savings Bank Street Team

50 for 50 PHOTO EXHIBIT:

Our Preservation Celebration will also feature the launching of our 50 for 50 Photo Contest. The photo exhibit (up from October 24 through November 22) will be the 50 best pictures submitted to our photo contest that show the things that make Cambridge such a great place to live and work. We’re looking for photos of the things that you could say “Cambridge wouldn’t be Cambridge without…” What do you think is a uniquely Cambridge place or institution? What makes this city your home?

For more info or to enter the 50 for 50 Photo Contest: visit cambridgehistory.org/50for50

Sat, 10/05/2013 - 12:30pm - 6:00pm

Find the 2014 Cambridgeport History Day schedule at THIS LINK.

---------------

2013

Join us for our 5th annual Cambridgeport History Day. Music, re-enactors, and activities in Dana Park and Walking Tours and "If this house could talk..." throughout the neighborhood.

Schedule of events in and tours from Dana Park                                                                  

11:00  “If This House Could Talk” booth opens
11:00-12:30 Industry tour - led by Charles Sullivan
12:00-5:00 Activities and music in Dana Park
1:00-4:00 Demonstrations of hand-operated letterpress
1:00-1:30  Marcia Deihl performance
1:00-4:00 Civil War encampment: talks & demonstrations
1:30, 2:30 & 3:30 Firing of Civil War rifles
2:00-4:00 Accordians!
2:30-4:00 Neighborhood tour - led by Kit Rawlins
5:00  CNA Potluck 

Thu, 09/26/2013 - 6:00pm - 7:30pm

Meet the spirits of some of nineteenth-century Cambridge’s most creative and original thinkers on an early evening stroll through one of the city’s loveliest neighborhoods. Tour begins on the front steps of the Longfellow house at 105 Brattle Street.

Developed and led by Kit Rawlins, Assistant Director of the Cambridge Historical Commission.

$5 for CHS Members $10 for Nonmembers 

Tickets

 

Thu, 09/19/2013 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Author James O'Connell will speak about his new book The Hub’s Metropolis: Boston’s Suburban Development, 1800-2010. The work is the first comprehensive historical overview of Boston’s suburban development, from the earliest country estates to suburban sprawl and the smart growth movement. This book provides historical context for understanding the region’s contemporary planning efforts that are addressing the challenges of low-density sprawl, climate change, and the global information age economy. The Hub’s Metropolis combines the perspectives of an urban historian and an experienced Massachusetts urban planner.

Thu, 08/22/2013 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

One of the funniest poems to date,
James Russell Lowell in 1848
published this great poetical satire,
earning him both acclaim and some ire.
In this series of jokes from his smart pen,
Lowell made his aim like a skilled marksman,
targeting Cooper, Fuller, Edgar Poe,
Ralph Waldo Emerson and Longfellow.
Poking fun at these writers with great wits,
this reading features some favorite tidbits.
165 years since published,
we think you will laugh before it’s finished.
Local literary historian Rob Velella invites you to join him at six,
the 22nd of August (some jokes are so bad they might cause disgust).

The Hooper-Lee-Nichols House
159 Brattle Street
Cambridge, Mass.

$5 per person

Rob Velella is an independent literary historian and playwright specializing in American literature of the 19th century. As a scholar, Velella has published articles and presented academic papers on figures as varied as Margaret Fuller, Rufus Griswold, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Walt Whitman. He has taken his research outside of academia by lecturing at various historical sites, libraries, and colleges from Pennsylvania to Maine. In addition to Poe, he has dramatically brought to life several other literary figures, including the young Henry Wadsworth, and Nathaniel Hawthorne. Velella also maintains the American Literary Blog (http://www.americanliteraryblog.blogspot.com/), an "almost-daily celebration of important (and not-so-important) dates in 19th-century American literary history."

Wed, 08/14/2013 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Not all historical markers are historically accurate. Some buildings tell stories that aren’t entirely what they seem. This tour will look at some questionable items in our city.

Tour led by Gavin Kleespies

Meet at the intersection of Fayerweather and Brattle streets

$5 for CHS members
$10 for non-members

 

Tickets

Sun, 07/14/2013 - 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Did you know that Cambridge has been home to a mad scientist who can revive the dead, a teenager who met with George Washington, and a man who can see into his own future? Across the centuries, Cambridge has inspired writers of fiction and poetry as an ideal setting for their literary creations. This tour steps into the fictional worlds that these writers have imagined. From haunted houses to Harvard Square cafes, we’ll visit a variety of sites featured in works of literature that take place in Cambridge. Come experience the places that have sparked the imaginations of  novelists and poets from around the world.

Tour meets at the front gate to the Longfellow House/Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site (105 Brattle Street). This is a free and original walking tour made possible through a grant from the Cambridge Heritage Trust.

This tour is a part of the Cambridge Discovery Days, coordinated by the Historic Cambridge Collaborative.

Sat, 07/13/2013 - 1:00pm - 2:30pm

Did you know that Cambridge has been home to a mad scientist who can revive the dead, a teenager who met with George Washington, and a man who can see into his own future? Across the centuries, Cambridge has inspired writers of fiction and poetry as an ideal setting for their literary creations. This tour steps into the fictional worlds that these writers have imagined. From haunted houses to Harvard Square cafes, we’ll visit a variety of sites featured in works of literature that take place in Cambridge. Come experience the places that have sparked the imaginations of  novelists and poets from around the world.

Tour meets at the front gate to the Longfellow House/Washington's Headquarters National Historic Site (105 Brattle Street). This is a free and original walking tour made possible through a grant from the Cambridge Heritage Trust.

This tour is a part of the Cambridge Discovery Days, coordinated by the Historic Cambridge Collaborative.

Sat, 07/13/2013 - 11:00am - 12:30pm

Character re-enactor Jessa S. Piaia will present a living history portrayal of Rachel Revere, in the program set in 1805, entitled “Meet Rachel Walker Revere, Wife of Noted Patriot Paul Revere!” at the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House (159 Brattle Street) on Saturday July 13)  Paul Revere married Rachel Walker within five months of the passing of his first wife, Sarah, who died following the birth of their sixth child; Rachel took on the care of the children, and with Paul had six more of their own.  Clad in period attire, Jessa portrays this early 19th century couple of “forthright hospitality and remarkable good humour,” as she relates episodes of their life both during and after the American Revolution.  The program runs about 35 minutes in length, with Q&A discussion to follow, and is appropriate for ages 10 through adult.

Sat, 07/13/2013 - 10:45am - Sun, 07/14/2013 - 5:00pm

Photo Scanning 

Be a part of history! Bring any photo taken in Cambridge to the Historical Society and let us scan it for our digital collections and we'll give you back the original and a free scoop of ice cream (generously donated by Toscanini's).

159 Brattle Street, Cambridge
(note - our house is under construction, but we are still open, don't let the boarded up windows scare you) 

This project is a part of the Cambridge Discovery Days, coordinated by the Historic Cambridge Collaborative. 

 

Mon, 06/17/2013 (All day) - Fri, 06/21/2013 (All day)

Tour the amazing resources of Cambridge with behind the scenes tours of 12 archives in the city. Coordinated by the Cambridge Historical Society, the tour will feature: 

Cambridge Historical Commission
Cambridge Public Library's Cambridge Room
Cambridge Public Works
Christ Church
First Church of Cambridge
Freemasons Lodge
Harvard Graduate School of Design
Harvard Property Information Resource Center
Harvard University Archives
MIT Institute Archives & Special Collections
MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies Special Collection
MIT Rotch Library

See amazing things you never knew were in our city and hear from the people who care for them. 

For more information, please visit Cambridgearchives.org

Tue, 06/04/2013 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Hear how author and former Boston area resident was inspired to write her unique biography, Dear Mr. Longfellow: Letters to and from the Children’s Poet. Follow her research journey to find the story behind a special gift made for Henry Wadsworth Longfellow by the children of Cambridge to celebrate the poet’s 72nd birthday.

“Meticulously researched, Dear Mr. Longfellow uses letters written by actual children to their beloved poet to re-create, in rich and often-moving detail, the life of a writer who took his readers seriously, and none more so than the youngest of them.”
-Christoph Irmscher
Author of Longfellow Redux

“A fresh and delightful way to learn about what Longfellow’s poems meant to his young readers.”
Mayor Henrietta Davis

A former children’s librarian, Pearl has been a professional storyteller for twenty years. She gives presentations at schools, libraries, and festivals.

RSVP: 617.547.4252 or rsvp@cambridgehistory.org

Thu, 05/09/2013 - 6:00pm - 9:00pm

Join us for our Spring Benefit on and about the Charles River

Meet at the Cambridge Boat Club for drinks, speakers, and a light dinner followed by a twilight cruise down the river and dessert.

Only 100 tickets are available for this event and start at $150 per person.

All funds raised go to support the Cambridge Historical Society's programs, archives and capital campaign to restore the Hooper-Lee Nichols House.

Tickets and Sponsorship
Names of Attendees

 

Guest Speakers

Renata von Tscharner
President and founder of the Charles River Conservancy, Renata was trained as an architect
and urban designer in Switzerland. Her professional life has focused on planning and improving public spaces. Among her many accomplishments, Renata has worked on the Covent Garden Market in London, coauthored books, and taught at several colleges in the
United States.

Jason Weeks
The Cambridge Arts Council provides services and programming designed to nurture and stimulate public awareness of and support for the arts. As executive director, Jason helps develop, refine, and produce programs. He lectures on effective strategies related to arts administration at schools and conferences. Jason has a background in music and theater.

Charles Sullivan
Executive director of the Cambridge Historical Commission, Charles has a degree in urban planning from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. In his time at the Cambridge Historical Commission, he has steered the agency to national recognition as a leader in local historic preservation and worked to make the Historical Commission a resource for the community.

 

Thursday, May 9

6:00 PM   Reception and program at the Cambridge Boat Club:
2 Gerrys Landing Road  Cambridge, MA 02138

7:30 PM   Boat tour departs

8:30 PM   Dessert reception at the boat club

 

Sponsors

Ambit Creative Group

Cambridge Innovation Center

Capizzi and Co. Inc

Green Street Grill

East Cambridge Savings Bank

Isaac Harding House Bed & Breakfast Hotel

Irving House at Harvard

NStar Electric & Gas Corporation

Prellwitz Chilinski Associates

Summer Shack

TAGS Hardware

Trinity Property Management

Ben and Jerry's Ice Cream

Bonny's Landscape Service, Inc.

Boston Beer Company

Cambridge Office of Tourism

Craigie on Main

Matthew Curtis

Watertown Dunkin' Donuts

Finale Bakery & Desserterie

Henry Bear's Park

Ikeda Center for Peace, Learning and Dialogue

Jean Brooks Landscapes

Joie de Vivre

Leavitt & Pierce

Mr. Bartley's Burger Cottage

Passim

Riley to the Rescue Catering

 Click HERE to join our list of sponsors for this event

 

Parking Information

You may park in the Cambridge Boat Club lot for free. If the lot is full, you may park across the street in the BB&N parking lot. There is no fee or special pass needed to park in the BB&N lot as it is owned by the city and is available to the public at all times.

 
 
 

 

 

 

Sun, 04/21/2013 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm

The Suzanne Revaleon Green Lecture series presented by the Cambridge African American Heritage Alliance will feature Dr. Ida E. Jones, who will speak on her book, The Heart of the Race Problem: The Life of Kelly Miller.   

Dr. Jones is a native of Cambridge and the senior manuscript librarian in the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center. She is a graduate of Howard University, earning a B.A. in Journalism in 1992 and a Ph.D. in 2001. Her field of study centers around African American religion and historic records preservation. 

Born in July 1863, Kelly Miller was a renowned Washington, D.C., educator, author, lecturer, and columnist. In 1887 he was the first the first African American admitted to Johns Hopkins University to pursue a doctorate in mathematics, physics, and astronomy. In the mid-1890s, he shifted his focus to the problem of race to address deteriorating race relations and to strengthen the African American community.

Wed, 04/03/2013 - 6:30pm - 8:00pm

Innovation districts are all the rage, with cities around the world attempting to create them. What makes them work – the presence of a world class university, the proximity of research labs to start-ups, or the easy access to venture capital?
Along with these questions is a question of self-interest: Can they be replicated? A panel of experts will discuss the phenomenon of innovation districts and examine whether they are a passing fad, or are here to stay.

Tim Rowe - Founder, Cambridge Innovation Center
Guillaume Pasquier - Deputy Director, Paris Saclay
Gavin Kleespies - Executive Director, Cambridge Historical Society
David Dixon - Principal, Goody Clancy
Marc Draisen - Executive Director, Metropolitan Area Planning Council
Sam Seidel - Moderator, Former Cambridge City Councillor
At the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Piper Auditorium (48 Quincy Street, first floor)

Thu, 03/21/2013 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Christopher Sokolowski, paper conservator at the Weissman Preservation Center at Harvard University, will give a presentation on his experience as a scholar in the Attingham Summer School in 2009. He’ll explain how the privileged access to approximately twenty-five buildings in three regions of England with on-site instruction by staff curators and property owners, as well as seminars by eminent visiting scholars, enriched his work as an American paper conservator.

 

The Attingham Summer School is academically intensive and physically rigorous program designed for scholars, arts professionals, and collectors who are interested in furthering their knowledge about the British country house. Museum directors, curators and educators, architectural historians, architects and landscape architects, conservators, interior designers specializing in historic preservation, teachers, and advanced graduate students of the fine and decorative art from around the world attend. For more information, visit http://www.americanfriendsofattingham.org/summer.html

 

Image: Caulke Abbey, Derbyshire, England. A property visited during the program that was undergoing a unique historic preservation effort to stabilize everything as it was found, including peeling wallpaper.

 

Tickets

Sun, 02/24/2013 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm

Character reenactor Jessa Piaia will present a dramatic portrayal of Isabella Stewart Gardner (1840-1924) in “A Visit with Isabella Stewart Gardner: America’s First Patroness of the Arts.” The drama is set in 1910, seven years after the opening of Fenway Court, the house-museum which Mrs. Gardner designed and built for her extensive art collection, and willed to the City of Boston upon her demise. A recognized leader of Boston’s emerging salon scene, Mrs. Gardner, with characteristic verve and candor, relates episodes about her luminous circle of family and friends, relives journeys to exotic lands, and shares other potentially scandalous encounters. The portrayal runs approximately 50 minutes in length, with an informal Q&A to follow.

Piaia uses drama to reveal the accomplishments, struggles, and contributions of women to American history.  Clad in period attire, she is acclaimed for “recreating history in the fullest sense,” and for using “solid research and compelling writing” in her artistry. Ms. Piaia studied performance at London’s Oval House Theatre and graduated from the University of Massachusetts in Boston. Research for this program was conducted at the archives of The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum; Historic New England (nee The Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities); Beauport Sleeper McCann House in Gloucester; Boston Public Library microtext department; Massachusetts Genealogical Society; The Church of the Advent, and The Society of St. John the Evangelist.

 

Tickets

Thu, 02/21/2013 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

In OUT FROM THE SHADOW: The Story of Charles L. Gittens Who Broke the Color Barrier in the United States Secret Service, author Maurice A. Butler celebrates the life of an ordinary man who dared to do extraordinary things. Gittens, a Cambridge native, was the first African American to become an agent for the United States Secret Service. The biography traces his life as it converged with several remarkable episodes in history.

Maurice Butler grew up in Washington D.C.. He attended Bowdoin College and returned to D.C., where he was a public school teacher, varsity coach and administrator for thirty-five years.

This event is co-sponsored by the Cambridge African American Heritage Alliance.

At the Cambridge Historical Society 159 Brattle Street Cambridge, Mass

Sun, 01/27/2013 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm

A business meeting, including the election of the Society’s governing council, will precede the program. Refreshments will follow. Members are urged to attend to cast their votes. Nonmembers are welcome, and admission is free.
Program:
Cynthia Kennedy Sam will speak about the life of her maternal grandfather, the sculptor Bela Lyon Pratt. In Pratt’s short life, he created over 180 pieces of sculpture, including the Historical Society’s Longfellow Medal.
According to all reports, Pratt was renowned for his generosity, humor and kindness. His life circled around his home in Jamaica Plain MA, his studio, and his professorship as head of the Sculpture Department at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston. His early death on May 18th, 1917, at age 49, ended a promising career, but left behind a solid reputation as a Beaux Arts, deeply American sculptor.

Wed, 12/12/2012 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

 

Join us for a holiday open house featuring food, friends, and music!
 

Wednesday, December 12, 2012
6:00-8:00 p.m.
at the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House
159 Brattle Street
Cambridge, Massachusetts
 

Image: Shady Hill Winter Scene (1885-1895), CHS Image Collection.

Wed, 11/14/2012 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

James O'Brien, PhD, will talk about the Cambridge Historical Society's first Kickstarter campaign and how social media was used to raise funding to process our Rounder Records collection. He will provide information about the collection, its value to researchers, and how we plan to make it available to the public. Betsy Siggins, founder of the New England Folk Music Archives, will also bring us up to date on their recent activities. The talk will be followed by a question-and-answer session, refreshments, and a performance by the Whiskey Boys. All are welcome.
 
This event is co-sponsored by the New England Folk Music Archives.

Wed, 10/17/2012 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

SOLD OUT

INSTANT: THE STORY OF POLAROID is a book about a very unusual company. In the 1960s and 1970s, Polaroid was what Apple is today: the coolest technology company on earth, the one with irresistible products, the one whose stock kept climbing way past the point of logic. In its heyday, Polaroid was an absolute innovation machine—a scientific think tank that periodically kicked out a fantastically profitable, covetable product. In fact, the late Steve Jobs expressly said that he modeled his company to a great extent after Polaroid.

Instant is a business story about what happens when a company loses its innovative spark. It is a fine arts story, showcasing the amazing things photographers (from Ansel Adams to Andy Warhol to Chuck Close) did with Polaroid film. It is a technology story, of a company that created and maintained a niche all its own for 60 years. And it is a pop culture history, of a friendly product that millions of people absolutely adored.

 

Please rsvp to rsvp@cambridgehistory.org

Sat, 09/29/2012 - 12:00pm - 7:00pm

Since 2009, Cambridgeport History Day and “If this house could talk . . .” have celebrated one of Cambridge’s most vibrant neighborhoods. Cambridgeport History Day is an all-day fair that includes walking tours, history exhibits, photo id games, and historical re-enactors. This year, there will be a special focus on the War of 1812, how it ruined plans for Cambridgeport, and the streets throughout the neighborhood that commemorate it. “If this house” is a chance for the buildings of Cambridgeport to tell their special and unique stories through the creation of hand-drawn markers. The signs can talk about almost anything—the history of the house, a description of cool stuff a resident found in the attic, or family experiences from funny stories to a brand new garden.
 
Click here for more info
 
Cambridgeport History Day is sponsored by the Cambridgeport History Project. Mayor Henrietta Davis and Michael Kenney serve as co-chairs, and Gavin Kleespies of the Cambridge Historical Society is the project manager. The Cambridge Arts Council, Cambridge Historical Commission, Cambridge Historical Society, Cambridgeport Neighborhood Association, and Riverside Boat Club are co-sponsors of the project.
 
The Cambridgeport History Day and "If This House Could Talk..." are sponsored through the generous support of the Cambridge Savings Bank, Cambridge Trust, and Forest City.

Thu, 09/13/2012 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

In Learning from the Sixties, Maher traces his progress from a privileged background in Houston, Texas, to a Harvard education and volunteering as an antiwar activist. He went on to debate city councilor and former mayor Al Vellucci, back rent control, and become a leader of the New Left. Maher later helped build Neighbor to Neighbor, a progressive organization advocating for community control and improved standards in working-class neighborhoods. It continues to have a major impact on Massachusetts politics.

Free for CHS members | $5 for nonmember
 

Reservations

Or RSVP to rsvp@cambridgehistory.org

Sat, 08/11/2012 - 2:00pm - 3:30pm

August 4 & 11 | 2 PM | Loeb Drama Center | 64 Brattle St | Cambridge
Do you like history, the performing arts? If so, join us on our Cambridge Discovery Day tours. You will be taken around Harvard Square to examine the history of traditional and nontraditional performing arts, ranging from the street performances of Amanda Palmer and puppeteer Igor Fokin to the American Repertory Theater. This tour was developed through the support of the Cambridge Heritage Trust.
This tour is a part of the city wide Cambridge Discovery Days, for more information on the tours across the city, please visit: http://www2.cambridgema.gov/Historic/walks.html

Sat, 08/04/2012 - 2:00pm - 3:30pm

August 4 & 11 | 2 PM | Loeb Drama Center | 64 Brattle St | Cambridge
Do you like history, the performing arts? If so, join us on our Cambridge Discovery Day tours. You will be taken around Harvard Square to examine the history of traditional and nontraditional performing arts, ranging from the street performances of Amanda Palmer and puppeteer Igor Fokin to the American Repertory Theater. This tour was developed through the support of the Cambridge Heritage Trust.
This tour is a part of the city wide Cambridge Discovery Days, for more information on the tours across the city, please visit: http://www2.cambridgema.gov/Historic/walks.html

Sat, 08/04/2012 - 11:00am - Sat, 08/11/2012 - 4:00pm

Saturday, August 4 and 11 from 11 to 4 as a part of the city wide Cambridge Discovery Days, the Historical Society will host our photo scanning days.

Photo Scanning Days
August 4 & 11 | 11 AM-4 PM | 159 Brattle St | Cambridge
If you bring a photo that was taken in Cambridge to the Cambridge Historical Society and let us scan it for our digital collection, we’ll give you back the original and give you a free scoop of Toscanini’s ice cream! Gus and Mimi Rancatore have generously donated 100 scoops of ice cream, so there is no need for a coupon or any delayed gratification; bring in a photo, walk out with an ice cream.

This is your chance to add your personal view to the history of Cambridge.

• What kind of photos are we looking for? Just about anything in Cambridge: block parties, school plays, your house when you first moved in, big snow storms, hurricanes, parades, birthday parties, your dog on your back porch, you name it, we’re probably interested. The only thing we’re not looking for is photos taken within the last year, it needs to have a little history to get an ice cream.

• Why do we want these? The images from personal collections are a great way to document the history and changes in Cambridge. In past years we have received images of the Blizzard of ’78, a 1960s shot of the inside of Elsie’s Diner, street scenes of Central Square in the 1990s, images of the Saints Cosmas and Damian Parade from both the 1950s and the 1990s, little league pictures, first communion pictures, and neighborhood shots.

• What will we do with these? We’ll add them to our digital collection of images of Cambridge. They will be available to people interested in the history of Cambridge and the Historical Society may use them in educational displays or publications. You will retain the copyright to the image, so if we wanted to use the image in a for profit way, we would have to contact you for your consent prior to doing so.

• Can you have a copy of the digital file? Sure.

• Can you bring multiple images? Sure, although we can only offer one ice cream per-person.

Questions? Comments? Contact Gavin Kleespies at infor@cambridgehistory.org

Images (counterclockwise from top left): Mary Dorothy and Ruth McElwain, ca. 1928, courtesy of Sandra Dolan (scanned 2010); Neighborhood kids, 1970s, courtesy of Rick Levy (scanned 2009); The blizzard of ’78 along the Charles, 1978, courtesy of Penelope Kleespies (scanned 2010); Bicentennial Celebration in Harvard Square, 1976, courtesy of Jinny Nathans (scanned 2009); Memorial Hall, taken between 1925 and 1956, courtesy of Barbara Yeoman (scanned in 2009)

 For more information on the city wide tours, please visit: http://www2.cambridgema.gov/Historic/walks.html

Mon, 07/09/2012 - 5:00pm - Thu, 07/12/2012 - 5:00pm

The Open Archives tour is a chance to see behind the scenes at a number of unique archives and collecting agencies in Cambridge. This year, there will be twelve archives featured over four days (3 per day), from July 9 through July 12.
The tours are divided into four categories
 

City Collections

Cambridge Historical Commission
Cambridge Room of the Public Library
Cambridge Public Works Department

Harvard Collections

Harvard University Archives
Houghton Library at Harvard
Schlesinger Library at Harvard

Cultural Collections

Mount Auburn Cemetery
Cambridge Historical Society
The Longfellow House - Washington's Headquarter's National Historic Site

MIT Collections

MIT List Visual Arts Center
MIT Institute Archives & Special Collections
MIT Museum

 
You can sign up for one, two, three, or four tours, but you must sign up for each tour individually. 

Click here to register for the 2012 Open Archives Tours.

Wed, 06/06/2012 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Lecture by author Heli Meltsner
The Hooper-Lee-Nichols House - 159 Brattle Street

Wed, 06/06/2012 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Architectural historian Heli Meltsner will discuss and show images from her recent book, The Poorhouses of Massachusetts: A Cultural and Architectural History at the Cambridge Historical Society, June, 6:00pm - 8:00pm, The Hooper-Lee-Nichols House - 159 Brattle Street. Free for members $5 for non-members. Please register at rsvp@cambridgehistory.org or by calling 617-547-4252. 
 
Poorhouses, as in “Be careful or you’ll send us all to the poorhouse” was, for most of our history a real threat rather than the kind of language fossil it has become. They were unfortunate very real places of last resort. Massachusetts towns and cities used them to shelter their destitute, elderly, medically indigent, orphans and mentally ill residents. In 1860, two thirds of our municipalities delivered needed support in a poorhouse or town farm. As late as 1945, one quarter retained one. The state only took over the job of delivering welfare in 1968.
 
Meltsner has identified 46 of these surviving buildings built by municipalities, two of them in Cambridge, and 52 old houses recycled for the purpose. Her book discusses the development of the institutions, the life within their walls and their architecture. Meltsner has also documented five still extant tramp houses erected to segregate the huge number of vagrants that flooded the roads in search of work or a meager meal and hard bed.
 
Come and learn how Massachusetts dealt with its poor, homeless and mentally ill before the inception of Social Security and current welfare programs. 

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm

Learn about Cambridge's role as an unrivaled center of innovation at our Spring Benefit and help us continue to preserve the history of our city. 

 

From the vaccines you received as a child to the software on your computer to the eBook screen you read, you can't go through a day without using something that was invented in Cambridge.

The sewing machine, fire hoses, frozen orange juice, and venture capital all started here. "Innovation: How Cambridge Changed America" will explore the inventions, inventors, and dreamers that started in our city and how they changed the world.

We have been documenting this history for a year. Our work will culminate with a program and the launching of a new website. We hope you will join us and continue to support our work documenting the history of Cambridge.

Light refreshments will be served. Guests are encouraged to explore the remarkable interactive displays at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and learn about their work on the Human Genome Project, as well as the work to understand the molecular components of life.     

Our speakers will include:

Edward Goldfinger, Chief Financial Officer of Zipcar

Goldfinger, a seasoned CFO in charge of planning and managing all of those Zipcar doubloons, will talk about the innovative new car rental company that started in East Cambridge and is fueling the "New Urbanism" movement. Most recently, he was the CFO of Spotfire, a business intelligence and analytics software company, sold to TIBCO. This followed a successful run at Empirix, where Goldfinger held the CFO and then CEO position and led the company through significant growth. Earlier, he spent time at KPMG, nine years at PepsiCo, and held the CFO job at Sapient. He is a graduate of the Wharton undergraduate program at the University of Pennsylvania, and he was a CPA in Connecticut.

Michael D. McCreary, Deputy Chief Technology Officer of E Ink Corporation 

E Ink, which started in West Cambridge, has created a revolutionary electronic ink with a paper-like high contrast, ultra-low power consumption, and a thin, light form. Used in eBooks, eNewspapers, eTextbooks, watches, Smartcards, electronic shelf labels, battery/memory indicators, and public information and promotional signs, E Ink is a part of Amazon.com's Kindle, Barnes & Noble's Nook, Sony's Reader, and products by Casio, Citizen, Hanvon, Hitachi, Lexar, Motorola, Plastic Logic, and Samsung. McCreary is responsible for creating a portfolio of advanced technologies that will enable new generations of novel display products. A veteran of the imaging industry, he held a number of leadership positions with Eastman Kodak Company, including serving as the general manager of the Microelectronics Technology Division. McCreary earned a B.S. from Principia College and a Ph.D. in Physical Organic Chemistry from MIT.  

Eric Freedman, Senior Director of Marketing at AeroDesigns, Inc,

AeroDesigns is revolutionizing how medicines and nutrients are delivered. Cofounded by Tom Hadfield and Harvard professor David Edwards, AeroDesigns is working to develop a new way of delivering food and nutrients using a novel aerosol delivery system. Eric Freedman will talk about this exciting new technology and distribute LeWiffs, or calorie free breathable chocolates.

Gavin W. Kleespies, Executive Director of the Cambridge Historical Society

Kleespies has been working with Katie MacDonald, a volunteer, for a year to document the history of innovation in Cambridge. They have created a new website that explores the history of thirty innovations that have roots in Cambridge. Kleespies will quickly review a selection of these innovations and how they have changed the world.

Wed, 04/25/2012 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Jack Wofford, Anthony Flint, and Susanne Rasmussen will talk about the impact the fight over the Inner Belt had on the city planning and the way people think about transportation.

 

The program will be held in the Lecture Hall of the Main Branch of the Cambridge Public Library at 449 Broadway. This program had earlier been planned to be at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy at 113 Brattle Street, but we had to relocate due to the popularity of the event.

 

This is the third of three programs hosted by the Cambridge Historical Society and co-sponsored by MIT, Livable Streets, and the Lincoln Institute. The programs are underwritten by Irving House and Forest City. To attend, please email innerbelt@cambridgehistory.org or call 617-547-4252. 

 

Learn more about this history, the complete symposia, and our ten speakers here:
Inner Belt Symposia

The Inner Belt was a proposed interstate highway that would have connected I-93 to I-90 with an eight lane highway that would have gone straight through Central Square. This would have leveled parts of Area 4 and Cambridgeport, and would have essentially severed MIT, East Cambridge and Kendall Square from the rest of the city. The fight to stop it began in the 1950s and really gained steam in the late 1960s. Planners, activists, and universities became central in a campaign that included representatives from Cambridge, Brookline, Dedham, Lynn, Milton, Needham, Revere, Saugus, Somerville, East Boston, South Boston, Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, Hyde Park, and the South End. The community pressure caused the Governor to declare a moratorium, order the first Environmental Impact Study in America, and eventually reject the plan in the early 1970s. The Governor then led the successful effort to change federal law so that funds designated for Interstate highways could be used instead for public transit. Funds from the Inner Belt were used for the extensions of the Red Line to Alewife Station and Braintree and to move the Orange Line.

This multi decade struggle over the transportation landscape made national news and was probably the largest political fight in Cambridge in the 20th century. It is also responsible for a large part of the quality of life in Cambridge, which is now renowned as a walk-able city with a comfortable scale.

We have three programs, in three locations, with nine speakers who include MIT faculty, the former secretary of transportation, community organizers, a Rhodes Scholar, and authors. The first program is at MIT’s Stata Center, the second is at the Public Library’s Lecture Hall, and the final program will be in the Lincoln Institute on Brattle Street.
 

Thu, 04/19/2012 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Ansti Benfield, Barbara Norfleet, Ann Hershfang, and Gordon Fellman will discuss the work of community groups to stop the construction of this highway. This event will be held at the Cambridge Public Library. This is the second of three programs hosted by the Cambridge Historical Society and co-sponsored by MIT, Livable Streets, and the Lincoln Institute. The programs are underwritten by Irving House and Forest City. Please register for this program by emailing us at innerbelt@cambridgehistory.org or calling 617-547-4252.

 

 

Learn more about this history, the complete symposia, and our ten speakers here:
Inner Belt Symposia

The Inner Belt was a proposed interstate highway that would have connected I-93 to I-90 with an eight lane highway that would have gone straight through Central Square. This would have leveled parts of Area 4 and Cambridgeport, and would have essentially severed MIT, East Cambridge and Kendall Square from the rest of the city. The fight to stop it began in the 1950s and really gained steam in the late 1960s. Planners, activists, and universities became central in a campaign that included representatives from Cambridge, Brookline, Dedham, Lynn, Milton, Needham, Revere, Saugus, Somerville, East Boston, South Boston, Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, Hyde Park, and the South End. The community pressure caused the Governor to declare a moratorium, order the first Environmental Impact Study in America, and eventually reject the plan in the early 1970s. The Governor then led the successful effort to change federal law so that funds designated for Interstate highways could be used instead for public transit. Funds from the Inner Belt were used for the extensions of the Red Line to Alewife Station and Braintree and to move the Orange Line.

This multi decade struggle over the transportation landscape made national news and was probably the largest political fight in Cambridge in the 20th century. It is also responsible for a large part of the quality of life in Cambridge, which is now renowned as a walk-able city with a comfortable scale.

We have three programs, in three locations, with nine speakers who include MIT faculty, the former secretary of transportation, community organizers, a Rhodes Scholar, and authors. The first program is at MIT’s Stata Center, the second is at the Public Library’s Lecture Hall, and the final program will be in the Lincoln Institute on Brattle Street. 
 

Wed, 04/04/2012 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Fred Salvucci, Tunney Lee, and Robert Goodman will speak on the role city planners played in working with community groups. This program will be held in the Stata Center at MIT, Room 32-155. This is the first of three programs hosted by the Cambridge Historical Society and co-sponsored by MIT, Livable Streets, and the Lincoln Institute. The programs are underwritten by Irving House and Forest City. This program is full. To be added to the waiting list, please email innerbelt@cambridgehistory.org

 

Learn more about this history, the complete symposia, and our  ten speakers here: 
Inner Belt Symposia

The Inner Belt was a proposed interstate highway that would have connected I-93 to I-90 with an eight lane highway that would have gone straight through Central Square. This would have leveled parts of Area 4 and Cambridgeport, and would have essentially severed MIT, East Cambridge and Kendall Square from the rest of the city. The fight to stop it began in the 1950s and really gained steam in the late 1960s. Planners, activists, and universities became central in a campaign that included representatives from Cambridge, Brookline, Dedham, Lynn, Milton, Needham, Revere, Saugus, Somerville, East Boston, South Boston, Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, Hyde Park, and the South End. The community pressure caused the Governor to declare a moratorium, order the first Environmental Impact Study in America, and eventually reject the plan in the early 1970s. The Governor then led the successful effort to change federal law so that funds designated for Interstate highways could be used instead for public transit. Funds from the Inner Belt were used for the extensions of the Red Line to Alewife Station and Braintree and to move the Orange Line.

This multi decade struggle over the transportation landscape made national news and was probably the largest political fight in Cambridge in the 20th century. It is also responsible for a large part of the quality of life in Cambridge, which is now renowned as a walk-able city with a comfortable scale.

Sat, 10/01/2011 - 12:00pm - 5:00pm

If this house could talk booth at Cambridgeport History Day

The If This House Could Talk Booth at Cambridgeport History Day

Pop-Up History performance during Cambridgeport History Day

Pop-Up History performance during Cambridgeport History Day

Pop-Up History performance during Cambridgeport History Day

Pop-Up History performance during Cambridgeport History Day

If This House Could Talk... sign

If This House Could Talk... signs 

Sun, 09/25/2011 - 7:00pm - 11:00pm

On September 25, 2011 at 7pm, the Cambridge Historical Society will present "Cambridge Cosmopolitan: A 1960s Cocktail Party."
Hosted by Noir, located in the Charles Hotel, this promises to be a fun
evening of friends, style, and drinks. Meet new people interested in
midcentury design, art, and culture while enjoying Noir’s fabulous
cocktails!

Sun, 09/25/2011 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm

Author Judy Richardson speaks on her book:
Hands On The Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC. This is a co-sponsored program with the Cambridge African American Heritage Alliance.

Sat, 08/13/2011 - 1:00pm - 3:30pm

Starting at Lois Lilley Howe’s first commission, the Alfred Potter House, this tour will explore the work of America's first female architect. We will visit 12 homes that were designed or remodeled (or in some cases, both designed and remodeled) by Miss Howe.
 
Image from the Louis Lilly Howe Photographic Collection at the CHS.

Sat, 08/13/2011 - 1:00pm - 4:00pm

Bring a photo, taken in Cambridge, to the Cambridge Historical Society and let us scan it for our digital collection. We will give you a free Toscanini’s ice cream (courtesy of Toscanini’s). The photo can be of just about anything: birthday parties, buildings, favorite ice cream stores, sports on the Common, parades, festivals, etc. It just has to be in Cambridge and indentified.

Sat, 08/06/2011 - 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Starting at the building that used to manufacture Charleston Chews and
ending where Tootsie Rolls are still made today, this tour will feature
eight tasty stops from Cambridge’s past as a one of America’s largest
centers of confectionary manufacturing.

Sat, 08/06/2011 - 1:00pm - 4:00pm

Bring a photo, taken in Cambridge, to the Cambridge Historical
Society and let us scan it for our digital collection. We will give
you a free Toscanini’s ice cream (courtesy of Toscanini’s). The photo can
be of just about anything: birthday parties, buildings,
favorite ice cream stores, sports on the Common, parades, festivals, etc.
It just has to be in Cambridge and indentified.

Sun, 05/22/2011 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm
Sun, 05/22/2011 - 2:00pm - 4:00pm

Featuring talks by Barbara Wheaton, Gus Rancatore, Deborah Hughes, and Holly Heslop.

Middlesex Lounge
315 Massachusetts Avenue
$75

Tickets available soon. If you would like additional information or would like to request an invitation, please email us at rsvp@cambridgehistory.org.

Mon, 05/02/2011 - 8:00pm - 10:00pm

The first meeting of the Cambridge Historical Society Book Club will take place at the Hooper-Lee-Nichols House, 159 Brattle Street.

Grab a copy of As Always, Julia and join us for an evening of the life of Julia Child. Bring a sweet snack to share, since this is also a desert potluck!

Sun, 03/27/2011 - 3:00pm - 5:00pm

Join us for two talks on Cambridge's role in the Modernist movement in America. David Fixler, architect and President of DoCoMoMo/New England will illustrate the architects and buildings that came to define modern Cambridge and to place it firmly on the global design map. Jane Thompson will give a retrospective on the life of the Design Research stores in Cambridge, NYC, and San Francisco in which she was a partner with its founder, her husband, the renowned architect Benjamin Thompson. Tickets are $10 for CHS members and $15 for non-members.