Founding of the First Church in Cambridge

Address of Alexander McKenzie [at the celebration of the Two Hundred and Seventy-fifth Anniversary of the Founding of Cambridge, 1905]   On February 1, 1636, O. S., the First Church in Cambridge was formed. This was the eleventh church in Massachusetts. The first church under Hooker and Stone was about to remove to Connecticut, but a few of the members, … Read More

On A Certain Deplorable Tendency Among The Most Respectable Members Of The Community To Abstain From Church-going— As Observed In The Year 1796 (Part Two of Two)

By Prescott Evarts Read June 10, 1922 Read part one here! In the following year, Prophaners of the Sabbath were included in a list of other criminals who if they could not or would not pay the fines, should be punished by setting in the Stocks, or putting into the Cage not exceeding three hours; where the Offender has not … Read More

On A Certain Deplorable Tendency Among The Most Respectable Members Of The Community To Abstain From Church-going— As Observed In The Year 1796 (Part One of Two)

By Prescott Evarts Read June 10, 1922 There has recently come into the possession of the Cambridge Historical Society, as a gift from Rev. Henry Wilder Foote, a copy of “An Address to the Public from the Ministers of the Association in and about Cambridge, at their stated meeting on the second Tuesday in October, 1796.” The first part of … Read More

First Resident in “A More Goodly Country”

By Michael Kenney This article originally appeared in our Spring 2013 Newsletter.  Access our past newsletters here!    “This much I can affirm in general, that I never came to a more goodly country in my life,” wrote Thomas Graves shortly after his arrival in the Bay Colony in 1629. He was a planner and, after laying out Charlestown, was … Read More

Gerry’s Landing And Its Neighborhood

By Mrs. S. M. Gozzaldi Originally read on June 15th, 1918. This article can be found in the Proceedings of the Cambridge Historical Society Volume 13, from the year 1918.   When we visit a city or country that is new to us, we try to find out what is of interest in the place, what famous people have lived there … Read More

Riverside: A Rowing Club for Workers

By Richard Garver This article originally appeared in our Winter 2011-12 newsletter. Read other archived newsletters here.  Riverside Boat Club was founded in 1869 as a trade-based rowing club by workers, predominantly Irish, from The Riverside Press, which was located between River Street and Western Avenue. Its first boathouse was a disused press building. Rowing was one of America’s most popular … Read More

Where Portuguese Families Found a New Home

By Sarah Boyer This article originally appeared in our Spring 2013 newsletter. Read other archived newsletters here.  Portuguese families from the North End of Boston and East Boston started to move into East Cambridge soon after the Civil War. Most of them had emigrated from the Azores, an archipelago 800 miles off the coast of Portugal, mainly from the largest island, … Read More

The Discovery Of The Charles River By The Vikings (Part Three)

According To The Book Of Horsford By Wendell D. Garrett From Vol. 40 of the Cambridge Historical Society Proceedings, 1964-1966   …continued from last week   III   Eben Norton Horsford was unquestionably a man of genius and immense brilliance. He excelled in several careers over a long and fruitful life. Since he was a scientist by training, it is … Read More

The Discovery Of The Charles River By The Vikings (Part Two)

According To The Book Of Horsford By Wendell D. Garrett From Vol. 40 of the Cambridge Historical Society Proceedings, 1964-1966 …continued from last week  II   The storm, in which Horsford was to live his last dozen years, broke in May 1880. William Everett, sometime Latin tutor at Harvard College and later master of Adams Academy in Quincy, addressed himself … Read More

The Discovery Of The Charles River By The Vikings (Part One)

According To The Book Of Horsford By Wendell D. Garrett From Vol. 40 of the Cambridge Historical Society Proceedings, 1964-1966   O​nce​ again the partisans of Christopher Columbus and Leif Ericson are locked in battle. The most recent occasion for reopening this long-standing and irrelevant feud was the publication in 1965 by Yale University Press of a manuscript and map … Read More