Where Portuguese Families Found a New Home

By Sarah Boyer This article originally appeared in our Spring 2013 newsletter. Read other archived newsletters here.  Portuguese families from the North End of Boston and East Boston started to move into East Cambridge soon after the Civil War. Most of them had emigrated from the Azores, an archipelago 800 miles off the coast of Portugal, mainly from the largest island, … Read More

The Discovery Of The Charles River By The Vikings (Part Three)

According To The Book Of Horsford By Wendell D. Garrett From Vol. 40 of the Cambridge Historical Society Proceedings, 1964-1966   …continued from last week   III   Eben Norton Horsford was unquestionably a man of genius and immense brilliance. He excelled in several careers over a long and fruitful life. Since he was a scientist by training, it is … Read More

The Discovery Of The Charles River By The Vikings (Part Two)

According To The Book Of Horsford By Wendell D. Garrett From Vol. 40 of the Cambridge Historical Society Proceedings, 1964-1966 …continued from last week  II   The storm, in which Horsford was to live his last dozen years, broke in May 1880. William Everett, sometime Latin tutor at Harvard College and later master of Adams Academy in Quincy, addressed himself … Read More

The Discovery Of The Charles River By The Vikings (Part One)

According To The Book Of Horsford By Wendell D. Garrett From Vol. 40 of the Cambridge Historical Society Proceedings, 1964-1966   O​nce​ again the partisans of Christopher Columbus and Leif Ericson are locked in battle. The most recent occasion for reopening this long-standing and irrelevant feud was the publication in 1965 by Yale University Press of a manuscript and map … Read More

New Wine in Old Bottles

By Michael Kenney   Sunday brunch time and weekday happy hours, the courtyard at the corner of Broadway and Hampshire Street is a lively place, with hipsters and families enjoying the bars and restaurants grouped around the open brick-paved space. Hard to believe, but it was even more bustling a century ago, when shifts of workers came and went at … Read More

The Downside of Progress

By Doug Brown   Cambridge has made a lot of things over the centuries, not all of them valuable. Our manufacturing history has its dirty, dangerous downside, and dealing with the hazards and by-products of production has always been a challenge in this jam-packed, 7.1-square-mile city. By the end of the 19th century, the technological advances of the Second Industrial … Read More

SWEDENBORG CHAPEL: Living history

by Ruth Hobeika “Planting community” is how the century-old Swedenborg Chapel’s Reverend Sage Cole describes a year-long outreach set to launch in January, joining visions from opposite sides of the country. Anna Woofenden – currently a visiting consultant – is exploring the question of what it means to be a church today, when so many congregations are dwindling. She is … Read More

Early Glass Making In East Cambridge by Doris Hayes-cavanaugh

Early Glass Making In East Cambridge By Doris Hayes-cavanaugh Read 5 June, 1926   M​uch​ has been said recently about the business growth of Cambridge, and a number of publications have stressed the fact that Cambridge, and particularly the section known as East Cambridge, now stands very high in the scale of New England manufacturing centres. Imposing schedules of plants … Read More