Cambridge, The Focal Point Of Puritan Life (Part Four)

Catch up on part one of this post here! By Henry Hallam Saunderson Read April 22, 1947   Dealing With Dissenters While the Puritan leaders were carrying forward their highly significant enterprises, they had to deal with forces which endangered the very existence of their Colony, in which increasing thousands of people were investing themselves, their lives, and all that they … Read More

Cambridge, The Focal Point Of Puritan Life (Part Three)

Catch up on part one of this post here! By Henry Hallam Saunderson Read April 22, 1947 The Coming Of Thomas Hooker Newtowne was about to enter on a new phase of its life. In 1632 a congregation from Braintree, in the County of Essex, England, came over to the Colony and began a settlement near Mt. Wollaston. Today the name … Read More

Cambridge, The Focal Point Of Puritan Life (Part Two)

Catch up on part one of this post here! By Henry Hallam Saunderson Read April 22, 1947   Puritans And Politics It was early in the reign of Queen Elizabeth that this party which loved the Bible supremely and asserted the right of private judgment came to have a name, and that name was invented by one of their most powerful … Read More

Cambridge, The Focal Point Of Puritan Life (Part One)

By Henry Hallam Saunderson Read April 22, 1947 The common interpretation of Puritanism is a direct reversal of the historical reality. It is doubtful if any important movement in history has ever been more completely misrepresented. A progressive people have been described as conservative. A movement for breadth is spoken of as narrow. The endeavor to develop and apply kindly, … Read More

A “Townie” Benefactor

By Daphne Abeel   Frederick Hastings Rindge, Cambridge’s most important individual benefactor, was a ‘‘townie’’ who entered Harvard in 1875. The son of Samuel Baker Rindge, a successful merchant and businessman, Frederick grew up in the ‘‘Rindge mansion,’’ which still stands at the corner of Dana and Harvard streets. At Harvard, he was a loyal and enthusiastic student –– and … Read More

Founding of the First Church in Cambridge

Address of Alexander McKenzie [at the celebration of the Two Hundred and Seventy-fifth Anniversary of the Founding of Cambridge, 1905]   On February 1, 1636, O. S., the First Church in Cambridge was formed. This was the eleventh church in Massachusetts. The first church under Hooker and Stone was about to remove to Connecticut, but a few of the members, … Read More

On A Certain Deplorable Tendency Among The Most Respectable Members Of The Community To Abstain From Church-going— As Observed In The Year 1796 (Part Two of Two)

By Prescott Evarts Read June 10, 1922 Read part one here! In the following year, Prophaners of the Sabbath were included in a list of other criminals who if they could not or would not pay the fines, should be punished by setting in the Stocks, or putting into the Cage not exceeding three hours; where the Offender has not … Read More

On A Certain Deplorable Tendency Among The Most Respectable Members Of The Community To Abstain From Church-going— As Observed In The Year 1796 (Part One of Two)

By Prescott Evarts Read June 10, 1922 There has recently come into the possession of the Cambridge Historical Society, as a gift from Rev. Henry Wilder Foote, a copy of “An Address to the Public from the Ministers of the Association in and about Cambridge, at their stated meeting on the second Tuesday in October, 1796.” The first part of … Read More

First Resident in “A More Goodly Country”

By Michael Kenney This article originally appeared in our Spring 2013 Newsletter.  Access our past newsletters here!    “This much I can affirm in general, that I never came to a more goodly country in my life,” wrote Thomas Graves shortly after his arrival in the Bay Colony in 1629. He was a planner and, after laying out Charlestown, was … Read More